Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

The Holy Rosary, indicating our future salvation or damnation

St. Louis Marie Grignion de Montfort writes:

Here is what our Blessed Lady revealed to Blessed Alan de la Roche as recorded in his book, The Dignity of the Rosary: “Know, my son, and make it known to all, that lukewarmness or negligence in saying the Hail Mary, or a distaste for it, is a probable and proximate sign of eternal damnation, for by this prayer the whole world was restored.”  …

On the other hand, we know from experience that those who show positive signs of being among the elect, appreciate and love the Hail Mary and are always glad to say it. The closer they are to God, the more they love this prayer, as our Blessed Lady went on to tell Blessed Alan.

I do not know how this should be, but it is perfectly true; and I know no surer way of discovering whether a person belongs to God than by finding out if he loves the Hail Mary and the Rosary.

Quoted from True Devotion to Mary, by St. Louis Marie Grignion de Montfort, ¶¶ 250-251.

 

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

The Voice of Christ:

Do not consider yourself forsaken if I send some temporary hardship, or withdraw the consolation you desire.  For this is the way to the kingdom of heaven.

The Imitation of Christ, by Thomas à Kempis, Book III, Chapter 30.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

If all fathers fulfilled their duty of watching over the education of their children, we should have but few crimes and few executions.

St. Alphonsus de Liguori, Sermon 36, On the Education of Children, First Point, section 4.

 

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

For Love of God you should undergo all things cheerfully, all labors and sorrows, temptations and trials, anxieties, weaknesses, necessities, injuries, slanders, rebukes, humiliations, confusions, corrections, and contempt.  For these are helps to virtue.

The Imitation of Christ, by Thomas à Kempis, Book III, Chapter 35.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

If we wish to save our souls, we must overcome human respect, and bear the little confusion which may arise from the scoffs of the enemies of the Cross of Jesus Christ.  “For there is a shame that bringeth sin, and there is a shame that bringeth glory and grace.” (Eccl. iv. 25.)

St. Alphonsus de Liguori, Doctor of the Church, Sermon 27, On Human Respect, for the Sunday after the Ascension.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

The Voice of Christ:

Let not your heart be troubled……When you judge that almost all is lost, then very often you are in the way of gaining great merit.

The Imitation of Christ, by Thomas à Kempis, Book III, Ch. 30.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

 

Try to live now in such a manner that at the moment of death you may be glad rather than fearful.

 

My Imitation of Christ, by Thomas a Kempis, Book I, Chapter 23.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

 

We should be grateful for the Crosses we receive

Our Lord teaches us that we should thank God for the Crosses we suffer and these crosses should cause us to have great hope of salvation.

Teaching of St. John Chrysostom, Doctor of the Church, quoted in the Catena Aurea of St. Matthew’s Gospel, St. Thomas Aquinas, greatest Doctor of the Church, ch. 26, §8.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

 

A lover must embrace willingly all that is difficult and bitter for the sake of the Beloved, and he should not turn away from Him because of adversities.

 

My Imitation of Christ, by Thomas à Kempis, Book III, Chapter 5.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

 

The Imitation of Christ:

 

It is God’s prerogative to give grace and to console when He wishes, as much as He wishes, and whom He wishes, as it shall please Him, and no more.

 

The Imitation of Christ, by Thomas a Kempis, Book III, Chapter 7.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

 

The devil does not sleep, nor is the flesh yet dead; therefore, you must never cease your preparation for battle, because on the right and on the left are enemies who never rest.

 

The Imitation of Christ, by Thomas à Kempis, Book II, Chapter 9.

Words to Live by – from Catholic Tradition

No man appears in safety before the public eye unless he first relishes obscurity.  No man is safe in speaking unless he loves to be silent.  No man rules safely unless he is willing to be ruled.  No man commands safely unless he has learned well how to obey.  No man rejoices safely unless he has within him the testimony of a good conscience.

The Imitation of Christ, Book I, Chapter 20.